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2021, Week 11: Oct 10 – 15th

October 21, 2021

2021, Week 11: Oct 10 – 15th

Despite a slow end to last week, the final week of our migration monitoring season did not fizzle out as much as seemed likely. We banded 83 birds of 14 species which is quite good, considering it is a 6 day week and on typically the slowest week of the season (with an average of 65 birds). We recaptured 25 birds of 7 species including a very late House Wren that we banded back on September 25th. The week started very slowly with only 4 new birds on Sunday, thanks to high winds picking up suddenly during mid-morning. The next few days were pretty typical slow October days and poor weather conditions did not help. Very cold temps down to -5°C forced us to open late on Tuesday and early showers on Wednesday did the same. Finally, some calm but cool fall weather on the final two days of the season allowed for a strong finish. This was the third busiest Week 11 in the station’s history and the final two days were both record days with 25 and 28 birds banded on the Thursday and Friday, respectively, thanks to late flocks of yellow-rumps moving through.

The only new species for the week was a Sharp-shinned Hawk on the second last day which was long overdue! We normally catch a few of these each fall. Other highlights were 3 more Red-breasted Nuthatches, 2 Red-shafted Flickers, a 2nd Fox Sparrow as well as our 5th Virginia Rail!

Not surprisingly, ‘Audubon’s’ Warbler was the top species banded again with 17, followed closely by Song Sparrow with 15 and Lincoln’s Sparrow with 13. Ruby-crowned Kinglet rounded out the top 4 with 9 banded, which is above average for the first time this season. Overall, Yellow-rumped Warblers were far above the Week 11 average of 3.3 with 26 banded. Song Sparrow numbers were typical this week while Lincoln’s and White-crowned Sparrows were well above average. Oregon Junco were below average as were Common Yellowthroat and American Goldfinch which we didn’t encounter at all this week. Unfortunately we missed out on Swamp Sparrow, White-throated Sparrow, and Pine Siskin completely this season. We often band at least one or 2 of these late in the fall, but not every year.

And that’s it for the 2021 season! We finished with 2146 birds of 58 species which is actually a good total (the fourth highest ever, in fact!) considering how slowly the season started. However, the species total is a little below the station average of 60. Thanks to all the volunteers who lent a hand this year and keep an eye out for a season summary coming soon!

SpeciesNumber banded
‘Audubon’s’ Yellow-rumped Warbler17
Song Sparrow15
Lincoln’s Sparrow13
Ruby-crowned Kinglet9
Unidentified Yellow-rumped Warbler6
‘Oregon’ Dark-eyed Junco4
White-crowned Sparrow3
‘Myrtle’ Yellow-rumped Warbler3
Red-breasted Nuthatch3
Marsh Wren2
‘Red-shafted’ Northern Flicker2
Wilson’s Warbler2
Virginia Rail1
Black-capped Chickadee1
Sharp-shinned Hawk1
Fox Sparrow1
Total83
The final species totals for the 2021 season.

2021, Week 10: Oct 3 – 9th

October 12, 2021

The penultimate week of our fall season was very productive with 206 birds banded which is twice the average and a new station record for Week 10! It was not overly diverse, however, with only 13 species banded. We also recaptured 60 birds of 11 species. Week 10 was a week of two tails, with the first half being pleasantly productive, before bird activity slowed to a near halt by the end of the week. Surprisingly, we banded 60 birds on Sunday, which coincided with over 100 human visitors during our annual Open House. Wednesday was another very good day with 67 birds, the third highest total ever for a day in October. Then the numbers took a heavy dip on Thursday with 18 new birds and even more so on Friday and Saturday with only 12 and 4 new on those days, respectively. The nights of Wednesday and Thursday were cold and clear which likely meant that most of the remaining migrants in the area took that chance to clear the station. Friday morning we arrived at VLBO to heavy frost and -2.5 °C, our coldest morning yet!

With species diversity steadily dwindling we only banded one new species this week – Red-breasted Nuthatch – which puts our species total at 57, below the end-of-season average of 60. We are still missing a few late migrants which we typically catch at least one of in most seasons – Swamp Sparrow, White-throated Sparrow, and also Pine Siskin. However, we did pass 2000 birds banded on Sunday, which certainly did not seem a sure thing a few weeks back! In passing this milestone, we are now on track to finish on par with the more typical recent seasons for total birds banded, despite the lower diversity and low numbers in August.

Once again, Yellow-rumped Warblers made up a large proportion of the week’s birds with 71 banded in total in Audubon’s, Myrtle, and Intergrade forms. Song Sparrow came in second place with 38 banded, followed by White-crowned Sparrow with 30, and Lincoln’s Sparrow with 21. Another milestone this week was a new station record for White-crowned Sparrow with a total of 145 banded so far, surpassing the previous record of 122 set in 2006. This species is not nearly this abundant in most years with the station average being only 35. While being a very common migrant through the South Okanagan, they typically prefer drier habitat than what is found at VLBO. As one would expect with the high overall numbers, all of the top species were far above average this week, as were Orange-crowned Warbler with what is likely their final push. And once again, Ruby-crowned Kinglet were well below average in what is turning into a poor season for them.

With this week’s record total we are looking at a relatively productive October; though with the steep drop in numbers at the end of the week, we may see a very quiet end to the season during the final days.

The week’s totals are below.

SpeciesNumber Banded
‘Audubon’s’ Yellow-rumped Warbler52
Song Sparrow38
White-crowned Sparrow30
Lincoln’s Sparrow21
Orange-crowned Warbler19
‘Oregon’ Dark-eyed Junco10
Unidentified Yellow-rumped Warbler10
‘Myrtle’ Yellow-rumped Warbler9
Ruby-crowned Kinglet6
Common Yellowthroat3
American Robin3
Marsh Wren2
Red-breasted Nuthatch1
‘Red-shafted’ Northern Flicker1
Wilson’s Warbler1
Total206
Our season totals after Week 10

2021, Week 9: Sep. 26 – Oct. 2

October 9, 2021

During Week 9 of our fall migration monitoring program we banded 177 birds of 16 species which is above the overall station average for this week and on par with more recent years. The busiest day of the week came on Saturday, the final day of our week, with 46 banded which bodes well for the rest of October which can be quite slow. The daily totals were quite variable with the slowest day having only 12 birds while other totals were in the 20s and 30s. Similarly, weather conditions were also very inconsistent – we opened with temperatures in the teens on a couple occasions while several other mornings brought temperatures below 5°C. Not surprisingly, the busiest day came on a mild but overcast day with scattered showers. Wind was problematic on a few occasions with uncharacteristically strong gusts from the south forcing us to close our nets early on three different days. In fact, Thursday brought some of the strongest winds the South Okanagan has seen in recent memory and despite most of our nets being quite sheltered, we were only able to open a few for three hours. Banding totals would surely have been higher if not for these winds. Overall we recaptured 46 birds of 7 species with Song Sparrow being the most recaptured. The school program and other visiting groups were also in full swing this week as we hosted 130 visitors over 5 weekdays.

Despite species diversity declining as we near the end of the season, we still banded three new species this week! These were Fox Sparrow, Pacific Wren, and a Hammond’s Flycatcher – all typically later season specialties. Other highlights were our 4th Virginia Rail and 2nd Red-winged Blackbird of the season, and a rather late MacGillivray’s Warbler.

‘Audubon’s’ Yellow-rumped Warbler claimed the top spot this week with 47 banded as Orange-crowned Warbler dropped down out of first place for the first time in 4 weeks. Song Sparrow was second with 27, followed by Lincoln’s Sparrow with 25, both above average, and then Orange-crowned Warbler with 17, which is slightly below average. Good numbers of ‘Myrtle’ and ‘Unidentified’ Yellow-rumped Warblers (intergrades between the two subspecies or indeterminable individuals) were mixed in with the flocks of Audubon’s that passed through this week. Breeding in northern BC, Myrtles tend to arrive at the tail end of the season, compared to the Audubon’s, of which many of the individuals we catch early on likely breed locally at higher elevations. When combined, Yellow-rumped Warblers comprised over 40% of all birds this week with 74 banded which is far above average.

White-crowned Sparrow continued their productive season with three times average numbers while Ruby-crowned Kinglet and Marsh Wren continued to be below average, as was Common Yellowthroat this week.

Bewick’s Wrens were recaptured on 4 occasions this week.

The week’s totals are below.

SpeciesNumber Banded
‘Audubon’s’ Yellow-rumped Warbler47
Song Sparrow27
Lincoln’s Sparrow25
Orange-crowned Warbler17
Unidentified Yellow-rumped Warbler16
White-crowned Sparrow14
‘Myrtle’ Yellow-rumped Warbler11
Ruby-crowned Kinglet6
Common Yellowthroat4
‘Oregon’ Dark-eyed Junco2
Marsh Wren1
Fox Sparrow1
MacGillivray’s Warbler1
Red-winged Blackbird1
Hammond’s Flycatcher1
Pacific Wren1
Spotted Towhee1
Virginia Rail1
Total177

2021, Week 8: Sep. 19 – 25

September 29, 2021

During Week 8 of our fall migration monitoring program we banded 384 birds of 24 species and recaptured 64 birds of 9 species. This was our busiest week of the season by far, even though we were completely rained out on Sunday! The total number of birds banded is almost twice the average for Week 8 and the third highest Week 8 total in the station’s history, after 2006 and 2019.

A storm passed through the area Saturday night and Sunday morning which led to massive fallout to start the week. Census in the rain on Sunday revealed dozens of sparrows, mostly White-crowns, around the station, which served as an alert a big day to come on Monday! Sure enough, we had by far our busiest day on Monday with 132 new birds and 11 recaps. In fact, it was the fifth busiest ever for VLBO! If that wasn’t enough, we also hosted a school group with 20 kids that day, one of 10 local school classes visiting the station this fall as part of OSCA’s Ecostudies program. Busy days continued for the rest of the week, albeit not quite like the first, with daily totals ranging from 60 to 79 total captures, before slowing down to 40 captures by the weekend. Without a doubt migration peaked this week, and will very likely slow down from here onward. We passed the season milestone of 1500 birds banded this week as well.

Highlights were many including 5 new species this week: Sora, Golden-crowned Sparrow (3), only the 4th to 7th recrods for VLBO(!), Golden-crowned Kinglet (4), ‘Oregon’ Dark-eyed Junco, and a Hermit Thrush! Other interesting birds this week were our 2nd each of Townsend’s Warbler and House Wren, our first Myrtle Yellow-rumped Warblers, and a late Western Wood-Pewee and Yellow-breasted Chat.

Orange-crowned Warblers continued their dominance with 110 banded, which is over twice the average for this week and makes up over a quarter of all birds banded this week. Following some distance behind were Lincoln’s Sparrow with 67, White-crowned Sparrow with 53, and Audubon’s Warbler with 51, all far above average, especially white-crowns which average only 10 for Week 8. Also above average were Wilson’s Warbler (for the first time), Song Sparrow, and Oregon Junco. Ruby-crowned Kinglet and Marsh Wren were close to par this week while Common Yellowthroat were below average.

It will be interesting to see how the rest of the season pans out with this relatively late peak now seemingly winding down.

The week’s totals are below.

SpeciesNumber Banded
Orange-crowned Warbler110
Lincoln’s Sparrow67
White-crowned Sparrow53
‘Audubon’s’ Yellow-rumped Warbler51
Song Sparrow35
Ruby-crowned Kinglet14
Common Yellowthroat13
Wilson’s Warbler9
‘Oregon’ Dark-eyed Junco4
Golden-crowned Kinglet3
Marsh Wren3
Golden-crowned Sparrow3
MacGillivray’s Warbler2
‘Myrtle’ Yellow-rumped Warbler2
‘Unidentified’ Yellow-rumped Warbler2
Black-capped Chickadee2
Gray Catbird2
Spotted Towhee1
American Goldfinch1
Hermit Thrush1
Townsend’s Warbler1
Sora1
House Wren1
Western Wood-pewee1
Cedar Waxwing1
Yellow-breasted Chat1
Grand Total384
Our season totals after Week 8

2021, Week 7: Sep 12 – 18

September 24, 2021

Week 7 of our fall banding season was the busiest so far with 295 birds banded which averages out to 42 birds per day! This total is well above the Week 7 average of 219 birds, and species diversity was right on average with 21 species banded. As has often been the case this season, strangely, the week started and ended with the busiest days being birds Sunday and Saturday with 64 and 65 birds on those days, respectively. The weather was all over the place this week with some very mild nights (temps in the teens), but also our coldest night of the season so far, as temps dipped down to 1.9 °C at the station and a light dusting of frost covered the reed canary grass! Cloudy skies were also more prevalent as the closing temp stayed below 20 °C on several days.

This week’s highlights include three new species: Townsend’s Warbler, ‘Red-shafted’ Northern Flicker, and Ruby-crowned Kinglet. We also banded our first ‘Myrtle’ Yellow-rumped Warbler and third Virginia Rail. And finally, we banded 2 more Yellow-breasted Chats which pushed them to a new season record of 15, passing last year’s record!

Orange-crowned Warblers once again led the charge this week with 95 banded, followed by Lincoln’s Sparrow with 55, and ‘Audubon’s’ Yellow-rumped Warbler with 32. These were all at least 1.5 times average for Week 7. Rounding out the top 4 was Common Yellowthroat with 29, which is only slightly above average. White-crowned Sparrow had another strong week with 27, which is close to 3 times average. If these numbers continue they may set a new record this year. Gray Catbirds are quickly petering out with only 3 banded, which is quite typical. Wilson’s Warbler again were below average with only 5 banded, and Ruby-crowned Kinglets have also been very slow to trickle in so far, though it’s still relatively early for them.

The week’s totals are below.

SpeciesNumber Banded
Orange-crowned Warbler95
Lincoln’s Sparrow55
‘Audubon’s’ Warbler32
Common Yellowthroat29
‘Gambel’s’ White-crowned Sparrow27
Song Sparrow25
Wilson’s Warbler5
‘Unidentified’ Yellow-rumped Warbler4
Gray Catbird3
MacGillivray’s Warbler3
Ruby-crowned Kinglet3
Yellow-breasted Chat2
Warbling Vireo2
Townsend’s Warbler1
‘Red-shafted’ Flicker1
Yellow Warbler1
Cedar Waxwing1
‘Myrtle’ Warbler1
Savannah Sparrow1
Swainson’s Thrush1
Black-capped Chickadee1
Virginia Rail1
Spotted Towhee1
Total295
Our season totals after Week 7.

2021, Week 6: Sep 5 – Sep 11

September 18, 2021

Week 6 of our migration monitoring season continued the gradual upward trend of the previous week, concluding with 207 birds banded of 24 species, which is an above-average result, and our busiest week since Week 1. We also recaptured 54 birds of 12 species. The daily banding totals were pretty consistent through the week with a minimum of 20 birds banded on Wednesday and a max of 36 on Saturday. We finished the week with exactly 1000 birds banded for the season, which is slightly below the 20-year average and lowest running total after Week 6 since 2017. Temperatures were relatively mild during the week, with a few warm summer days reaching into the high 20s by noon and with little wind.

The biggest highlight of the week came on Monday when a Belted Kingfisher hit net 10! Kingfishers always make for an exciting moment of banding and several volunteers and visitors were on hand to witness the occasion. Other highlights included our season-first each of Pacific-slope Flycatcher and Red-winged Blackbird, and two stunning adult male MacGillivray’s Warblers. Red-winged Blackbirds have been flocking in large numbers in in the cattail marshes around the station, so it was only a matter of time before one hit the net. However, this happens surprisingly rarely, with only 1.6 bander per year, on average.

Orange-crowned Warbler maintained a large lead as the top species of the week, with 59 banded, which is again well above average. Song Sparrow moved up to second 31 banded, almost twice the average for Week 6, as migrant individuals join the residents of this species in the area. Common Yellowthroat and ‘Audubon’s’ Warbler came in third and fourth with 28 (close to average) and 19 banded (much higher than average), respectively. Gray Catbird, White-crowned Sparrow, and MacGillivray’s Warbler were also above average this week, while Wilson’s Warbler and Lincoln’s Sparrow were below average.

Yellow Warbler were conspicuously absent this week (they average 4.2 for Week 6), indicating that perhaps they completed their pass through our region early this year. We also banded no Marsh Wrens this week, and they have been surprisingly absent in our nets for much of the season so far.

Week 7 is typically the busiest in September so this momentum should continue into next week!

SpeciesNumber Banded
Orange-crowned Warbler59
Song Sparrow31
Common Yellowthroat28
‘Audubon’s’ Warbler19
Gray Catbird15
Lincoln’s Sparrow14
‘Gambel’s’ White-crowned Sparrow9
Savannah Sparrow4
Warbling Vireo3
‘Unidentified’ Yellow-rumped Warbler3
MacGillivray’s Warbler3
Swainson’s Thrush2
Wilson’s Warbler2
Yellow-breasted Chat2
American Robin2
Spotted Towhee2
Pacific-slope Flycatcher1
Belted Kingfisher1
Western Tanager1
Western Wood-pewee1
American Goldfinch1
Willow Flycatcher1
Red-winged Blackbird1
Cedar Waxwing1
Black-capped Chickadee1
Total207

2021, Week 5: Aug 29 – Sep 4

September 8, 2021

Migration picked up this week at VLBO with a considerable increase in the number of birds banded, compared to the previous few – we banded 182 birds of 27 species. This is above average for the first week this year, when taking into account that this is usually a relatively slow week. In fact, week 5 is typically the slowest week of all August and September, averaging 130 birds over our 20-year history. We also recaptured 61 birds of 12 species. The busiest day of the week was Sunday with 38 new birds and 12 recaps, while mid-week was slow before activity picked up again toward the end of the week. The trend of cool nights continued this week, though temperatures rose into the early-to-mid 20s by the end of the mornings with clear skies and fresh air without smoke!

Two new species were banded this week: Gray Flycatcher, only the 15th ever banded at VLBO, and Dusky Flycatcher. Other exciting captures included our second Virginia Rail and Warbling Vireo, and three more Yellow-breasted Chats, the last of which was a station record tying 12th!

Orange-crowned Warbler jumped to the top of list this week, as expected this time of year, though 40 banded is more than twice the average. Common Yellowthroat was second with 31 which is also well above average, while Lincoln’s Sparrow (18), and Gray Catbird (16) rounded out the top four, both with very typical numbers for Week 5. White-crowned Sparrow, Western Wood-pewee, ‘Audubon’s’ Warbler, Western Tanager, and Swainson’s Thrush were also above average this week, while Willow Flycatcher and Wilson’s Warbler were below average. Could these results mean an earlier start to migration this year or is it just an isolated early push? We’ll see if the upward trend continues next week!

SpeciesNumber Banded
Orange-crowned Warbler40
Common Yellowthroat31
Lincoln’s Sparrow18
Gray Catbird16
Song Sparrow15
White-crowned Sparrow9
‘Audubon’s’ Yellow-rumped Warbler6
Yellow Warbler6
Western Wood-pewee5
Swainson’s Thrush4
Wilson’s Warbler3
MacGillivray’s Warbler3
Western Tanager3
Yellow-breasted Chat3
Black-capped Chickadee3
Willow Flycatcher2
Dusky Flycatcher2
Cedar Waxwing2
Marsh Wren2
Spotted Towhee2
Warbling Vireo1
Virginia Rail1
Northern Waterthrush1
Veery1
Gray Flycatcher1
American Goldfinch1
Savannah Sparrow1
Total182

2021, Week 4: Aug 22-28

August 31, 2021

The fourth week of our monitoring season has already passed and it was another slow week with 138 birds banded of 24 species. The weekly results have been surprisingly consistent so far with a range of only 126 – 138 birds banded across the last three weeks. Considering late August is typically a very slow time, this week’s total is actually in line with the Week 4 average of 131 birds. Feelings of fall were in the air this week with a drop to single-digit overnight temperatures and more mild daily highs. The week was off to a productive start with Monday being one of the busiest day of the season – with 45 total captures, before slowing down to the typical daily totals we’ve been seeing. We also recaptured 56 birds of 15 species, with Song sparrow being the most recaptured species.

New arrivals were White-crowned Sparrow with 3 banded on Aug 28th, and several less commonly banded species: American Redstart – the first in two seasons, House Wren, Least Flycatcher, and a Steller’s Jay – only the 5th ever banded at VLBO!

There was a change-up among the top banded species this week with Willow Flycatcher jumping to the top with 20 banded. This is somewhat surprising as the average for Week 4 is only 11.6 and lower than the previous weeks. Gray Catbird was second (18) but well below average, while Orange-crowned warbler climbed to third with over twice the average number banded (16), surpassing Yellow Warbler (13) which dropped to fourth, with an almost average total. Western Wood-pewee continued in far-above average numbers with 11 banded, as were Swainson’s Thrush and Wilson’s Warbler.

SpeciesCount
Willow Flycatcher20
Gray Catbird18
Orange-crowned Warbler16
Yellow Warbler13
Western Wood-pewee11
Song Sparrow11
Common Yellowthroat11
Wilson’s Warbler6
Swainson’s Thrush6
Lincoln’s Sparrow4
Yellow-breasted Chat3
White-crowned Sparrow3
Veery2
Northern Waterthrush2
MacGillivray’s Warbler2
American Goldfinch2
Steller’s Jay1
American Redstart1
Western Tanager1
Savannah Sparrow1
Least Flycatcher1
House Wren1
American Robin1
Rufous Hummingbird1
Grand Total138

2021, Week 3: Aug 15 – 21

August 24, 2021

2021, Week 3: Aug 15 – 21

Week 3 of fall banding at VLBO was just slightly more productive than last week with 133 birds banded of 22 species and 37 birds recaptured of 11 species. Our season total stands at 473 birds of 33 species after this week. These results continue this year’s trend of below average numbers of birds banded, as the average for Week 3 is 172.5 birds.

However, we did see some encouraging signs of increased activity on Saturday with 35 birds banded, half of them being Yellow Warblers! This flurry of activity was no doubt attributed to the cool and blustery fall-like weather over the weekend, which even brought some overnight showers. This type of weather often pushes migrating birds down out of the skies, a phenomenon known as ‘fallout’. Week 3 is typically the peak for Yellow Warbler migration through the Okanagan with 20 banded on average at VLBO. The timing this year is similar to past years, and so far this is one of the few of our abundant species that is seeing healthy numbers this year.

The only new arrival this week was Lincoln’s Sparrow which typically first show up this week. Other highlights were 2 Rufous and 1 Black-chinned Hummingbirds, and an adult male California Quail which we released unbanded.

The top 3 banded species remain unchanged from last week with Yellow Warbler continuing as the most abundant species with 26 banded, followed by Gray Catbird with 22, Willow Flycatcher with 15. Song Sparrow and Common Yellowthroat tied for fourth with 11. Of these, only Yellow Warbler is above average while the other top species are slightly below average. Western Tanagers continued their strong showing this season with 9 banded which is 4 times the mean for Week 3, and MacGillivray’s Warbler, Western Wood-Pewee and Swainson’s Thrush were also above average. On the other hand, Cedar Waxwing and American Goldfinch were banded in very low numbers compared to their Week 3 means.

A comparison of two hatch-year Western Tanagers: male on the left and female on the right.

The next two weeks are usually the slowest of the season before migration begins in earnest, so it will be interesting to see how they shape up this year. Perhaps we will see some late fledglings or an early push of migrants?

SpeciesBanded
Yellow Warbler26
Gray Catbird22
Willow Flycatcher15
Common Yellowthroat11
Song Sparrow11
Western Tanager9
Orange-crowned Warbler6
Western Wood-Pewee4
Swainson’s Thrush4
Lincoln’s Sparrow3
Veery3
MacGillivray’s Warbler3
Northern Waterthrush2
Eastern Kingbird2
Wilson’s Warbler2
Cedar Waxwing2
Marsh Wren2
Rufous Hummingbird2
Black-chinned Hummingbird1
Bewick’s Wren1
Black-capped Chickadee1
American Goldfinch1
Total133
Our station totals after Week 3.

2021, Week 2: Aug 8 – 14

August 18, 2021

Week two of our fall migration monitoring program was even less productive than the first with only 129 birds banded; but diversity was high with 26 species. Similar to last week, this total is far below the average of 188 birds for Week 2. We also recaptured 36 birds of 13 species. Counter to our hopes and expectations, the rain we received over the weekend did not bring more birds, even though it did clear up the smoke for a few days. After a very wet session on Sunday, we had mostly clear skies from Monday to Wednesday before the smoke began to move back in on Thursday. Day time temperatures were again very hot throughout the week.

Despite the overall low numbers, we did see some encouraging signs that migration is beginning. We saw movement through the station for early migrants like Northern Waterthrush, Lazuli Bunting, MacGillivray’s Warbler, and Veery. As well, Wilson’s Warblers finally showed up with three banded on Saturday, the busiest day of the season during which we banded six species of warblers. Other highlights were a Virginia Rail, one Black-chinned, two Rufous Hummingbirds, and two more Yellow-breasted Chats. Other new species for the station this week were Marsh Wren, Veery, Warbling Vireo, and Audubon’s Warbler which pushes the season total to 32 species. The real highlight of the week came on Friday when a juvenile Black-crowned Nigh Heron flushed from the pond during census! This species has not been observed at VLBO since 2007.

The most frequently banded species of the week were Yellow Warbler (24), Gray Catbird (20), Willow Flycatcher (17), and Northern Waterthrush (10). While most of the common species were banded in unusually low usual numbers, Northern Waterthrush, Western Tanager, and MacGillivray’s Warbler were banded in above average numbers.

SpeciesCount
Yellow Warbler24
Gray Catbird20
Willow Flycatcher17
Northern Waterthrush10
American Goldfinch7
Western Wood-Pewee6
Western Tanager5
MacGillivray’s Warbler5
Veery4
Common Yellowthroat4
Wilson’s Warbler3
Yellow-breasted Chat2
Song Sparrow2
Orange-crowned Warbler2
Lazuli Bunting2
Cedar Waxwing2
Black-capped Chickadee2
Warbling Vireo1
Virginia Rail1
Spotted Towhee1
Nashville Warbler1
Marsh Wren1
Eastern Kingbird1
Black-headed Grosbeak1
Bewick’s Wren1
Audubon’s Warbler1
Rufous Hummingbird2
Black-chinned Hummingbird1
Total126